Get Your Game On

Get Your Game On

Ever since I was young, my parents never allowed me to get a game console. Never. Whether it be Super Nintendo, Nintendo 64, GameCube, Sega Genesis, PS1, PS2, PS3, XBox, Xbox 360, or anything else, I was never allowed to play these at home. This made it really hard while in elementary and middle school because practically everybody at school had one type of game console or another, and most conversations pivoted on the newest games that would come out.

I tried convincing my parents numerous times to let me get one, but it was all to no avail. I slowly resigned myself to the fact that I’d never be as cool as others…I’d never fully understand my classmates’ conversations…

My life was over.

“Want to come and help distribute the Zakat-ul-Fitr?,” my father asked me.

It was a clear and bright sunny day, and I decided to accompany my father and an uncle as they drove from address to address, delivering food for the truly needy. I quite enjoyed myself as I raced up and down the stairs while carrying packets of meat and grains in both hands.

As we got in our car, having finished dropping off some food at a house, we saw that house’s door suddenly burst open. A Muslim woman came running out, looking slightly distraught as she quickly made her way to talk to us before we left.

“Brothers, please help me; my husband left us and the landlord is trying to kick us out of this house. My young children are all still in school, and I can’t work here. Please help me…”, she implored in faltering English with a pleading look in her eyes. We quickly got her information and promised to send it to a local Masjid that had allocated funds for such cases.

We drove off very quietly.

As we drove off with Ramadan slowly came to a winding close, it finally hit me. How in the world can I ask for hundreds of dollars in consoles, games, and other luxuries while our sisters in Islam are suffering? How can we neglect and even ignore fellow Muslim families while we sit back and just relax?

Let’s concentrate on what is important and step up our activism to help our Muslim brothers and sisters for the sake of Allah (subhanahu wa ta’ala). Many are suffering either physically or spiritually, so it is up to us to reach out to them and to get them to smile once more as they get back on their feet. Let’s not spend our money and time on buying and playing useless games, but spend it for the cause of Allah.

I leave you with a challenge: Get your game on.

Therefore, treat not the orphan with oppression, repulse not the beggar; and proclaim the Grace of your Lord” – Allah (subhanahu wa ta’ala) in Surah Duha, Ayahs 9-11.

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21 Comments

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  1. 1
    Jawaad Ahmad Khan

    True. Same situation. No games. ever.

    (Until I got a bit older and bought a (PC) game with my own money, which I still play now, but am cutting back on it…since it really is a big time-waster). Most of the time, I’d only play this game when I had NOTHING else to do (just a time-passer, unfortunately a useless one).

    But yes, it is true how our wealth is spread about in things that bring no benefit, when our money can go to such greater causes. Though, I think that money is only a small issue as well. Many people don’t have a lot of money to give away (I guess you have to see Muhammad Alshareef’s money master seminar to fix that :) ), but they CAN volunteer their time, their physical ability, their mental abilities, and themselves as a whole to do things for the sake of Allah.

    My dad actually wanted to start a program with this called “2 Hours For Allah”, where he’d basically ask a large group of people, just on a Saturday or something, and give 2 hours for Allah, working on some project (at the masjid or elsewhere). Everyone should be able to give 2 hours of their time for the sake of their Lord (and themselves).

    Good thoughts in this article.

    • 2
      Arif Kabir

      Wow, that’s a really amazing idea; if your dad could structure it in an experiment-style and record the results, that would be amazing and could be very inspiring and powerful to Muslims living anywhere in the States. What you said really reminded me about The Ummah Timer that was posted on this site not too long ago. It’s really amazing that if every Muslim (say, at least a billion) just spent a second for the sake of Allah, that would be the same as a 32-year-old man spending every single second of his life working for the sake of Allah. Imagine if every Muslim devoted themselves to furthering Allah’s cause… :)

  2. 3
    mama A to Z

    we were the uncool kids without a game system too, and I plan to have my son also be the nerd on the block… these days everything is media overload. How about reading a book already?

  3. 5
    shiney3

    lol, I also have never been able to get a game system, or any “useless” electronics.
    The article is a nice reminder for people who have forgotten about how much more they can do in their free time than play games and how much they can help themselves and others by doing some good.

  4. 6
    Jawaad Ahmad Khan

    True. Same situation. No games. ever.(Until I got a bit older and bought a (PC) game with my own money, which I still play now, but am cutting back on it…since it really is a big time-waster). Most of the time, I'd only play this game when I had NOTHING else to do (just a time-passer, unfortunately a useless one).But yes, it is true how our wealth is spread about in things that bring no benefit, when our money can go to such greater causes. Though, I think that money is only a small issue as well. Many people don't have a lot of money to give away (I guess you have to see Muhammad Alshareef's money master seminar to fix that :) ), but they CAN volunteer their time, their physical ability, their mental abilities, and themselves as a whole to do things for the sake of Allah.My dad actually wanted to start a program with this called “2 Hours For Allah”, where he'd basically ask a large group of people, just on a Saturday or something, and give 2 hours for Allah, working on some project (at the masjid or elsewhere). Everyone should be able to give 2 hours of their time for the sake of their Lord (and themselves).Good thoughts in this article.

  5. 7
    Aamer Khan

    Alhamdulillah I was also deprived of game consoles and television when i was smaller. Not that I didn’t sneak the occassional game or two lol.

    But one thing that is important about this article is your interaction with your father and his encouragement that you do community work with him. Many times parents will deprive their children of gaming consoles, and then provide no islamic or intellectual avenue for them to spend their time. And they won’t spend quality time with their children. So Alhamdulillah, there is a good example in your father.

    • 8
      Arif Kabir

      If you read carefully, it says my parents didn’t allow game consoles in the house lol, so I definitely did play but it was rather minimal.

      Yeah, may Allah (subhanahu wa ta’ala) reward all of our parents for pouring all of this time on us. Ameen…

  6. 9
    Arif Kabir

    Wow, that's a really amazing idea; if your dad could structure it in an experiment-style and record the results, that would be amazing and could be very inspiring and powerful to Muslims living anywhere in the States. What you said really reminded me about The Ummah Timer that was posted on this site not too long ago. It's really amazing that if every Muslim (say, at least a billion) just spent a second for the sake of Allah, that would be the same as a 32-year-old man spending every single second of his life working for the sake of Allah. Imagine if every Muslim devoted themselves to furthering Allah's cause… :)

  7. 10
    mama A to Z

    we were the uncool kids without a game system too, and I plan to have my son also be the nerd on the block… these days everything is media overload. How about reading a book already?

  8. 11
    Zainab

    My little brother begged and begged and begged for an x box 360 and since he’s the cutest and the youngest and whatever, my parents gave in… He never played on it much since he didn’t have any games. But when he discovered Call of Duty from his “best friend” who would lend it to him, he became OBSESSED with it. I hated it. It was so violent… And I also noticed that he was a lot more aggressive and rude when he played that game. The change is gradual. You can’t even notice it sometimes, but it’s a reality. He would play on and on for hours… until I put parental control on it, which pissed him off.

    Now the x-box is all broken (almost)… and he has no games. And no one to play with. Plus, he’s not around his old obsessed-with-games friends anymore. And boy, do I see a GREAT change in him.

    But like someone else mentioned in the comments, we don’t provide other avenues for them. That’s so true. I never thought of that. I should get him to do something like this =)

    (I saw this one in the drafts folder =) and was hoping it would be completed one day!)

    • 12
      Arif Kabir

      That’s so true! I got a lil’ bro and my parents let him get one of those handheld DS’s as he’s the chubbier and cuter one (lol). Sigh…But Alhamdulillah, he stopped and he’s now active in Karate, soccer, and other activities.

      Please make Dua that all the draft posts get published soon lol; it’s actually a lot of fun going back into thoughts of the past, bringing some life back into them, and then sharing it with others.

  9. 13
    shiney3

    lol, I also have never been able to get a game system, or any “useless” electronics.
    The article is a nice reminder for people who have forgotten about how much more they can do in their free time than play games and how much they can help themselves and others by doing some good.

  10. 14
    Aamer Khan

    Alhamdulillah I was also deprived of game consoles and television when i was smaller. Not that I didn't sneak the occassional game or two lol. But one thing that is important about this article is your interaction with your father and his encouragement that you do community work with him. Many times parents will deprive their children of gaming consoles, and then provide no islamic or intellectual avenue for them to spend their time. And they won't spend quality time with their children. So Alhamdulillah, there is a good example in your father.

  11. 16
    Zainab

    My little brother begged and begged and begged for an x box 360 and since he's the cutest and the youngest and whatever, my parents gave in… He never played on it much since he didn't have any games. But when he discovered Call of Duty from his “best friend” who would lend it to him, he became OBSESSED with it. I hated it. It was so violent… And I also noticed that he was a lot more aggressive and rude when he played that game. The change is gradual. You can't even notice it sometimes, but it's a reality. He would play on and on for hours… until I put parental control on it, which pissed him off. Now the x-box is all broken (almost)… and he has no games. And no one to play with. Plus, he's not around his old obsessed-with-games friends anymore. And boy, do I see a GREAT change in him.But like someone else mentioned in the comments, we don't provide other avenues for them. That's so true. I never thought of that. I should get him to do something like this =) (I saw this one in the drafts folder =) and was hoping it would be completed one day!)

  12. 17
    Arif Kabir

    That's so true! I got a lil' bro and my parents let him get one of those handheld DS's as he's the chubbier and cuter one (lol). Sigh…But Alhamdulillah, he stopped and he's now active in Karate, soccer, and other activities.

    Please make Dua that all the draft posts get published soon lol; it's actually a lot of fun going back into thoughts of the past, bringing some life back into them, and then sharing it with others.

  13. 18
    Maryam

    this is a beautiful article mashaAllah.
    straight from the heart :)
    subhanAllah.

    I pray that everyone gets parents like yours, who teach their kids whats really going to benefit them in the Hereafter ameen.

    jazakAllah.

  14. 19
    Maryam

    this is a beautiful article mashaAllah.straight from the heart :)subhanAllah.I pray that everyone gets parents like yours, who teach their kids whats really going to benefit them in the Hereafter ameen.jazakAllah.

  15. 20
    SumaiyahKhan

    same. i never got games, tv etc…

    but ya masha Allah. its something to remeber when you dont get something u want.
    theres ppl less fortunate.

  16. 21
    Aziza

    This article an excellent reminder of where our priorities should really be. When I was younger I didn’t have all of this either and I would always feel such a longing for it. When I finally did get a GameBoy it was like the greatest thing in the world.
    Didn’t realize it then, but now I thank my parents for sheltering me hehe! :)

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