desires

11

Inner Inferno

A blank page stared at me from the monitor. Thoughts pounded as they raced to put words together. Twenty-six little building blocks were set to construct, but the alphabet refused to fall in place for a blasted paper. I smacked the keyboard and buried my face in my sweaty hands. I wanted to smoke. I directed myself away from the thought, lifting my head as I took a deep breath. I had promised to quit. After attending a few Islamic conferences, listening to various CDs, and spending time at...

10

Letting Things Go For Allah

I was inspired to write this earlier today when a friend of mine asked me for advice: “I just cannot stop listening to music…I want to, but it’s too hard!” This is something we’ve all probably said to ourselves, or listened to others say. Whether the issue at hand is music or something else, we have a hard time letting go of the things that we hold dear in our hearts. There is a burning fire in some of us that makes us want to let go and change,...

32

Music Junkie Syndrome

I’m such a music junkie. I mean I was, but then I gave it up gradually, Alhamdulillah. I got rid of all the music from my mobile, then from my iPod, then from my laptop and then from my heart. It has not been that easy though; inadvertently do I hear music everywhere. It’s on TV, it’s when I go eat out with friends, and it’s in our cars, our gyms and everywhere else, even in washrooms. When I was younger, I loved listening to music, I knew every...

17

The Serpent Under The Innocent Flower

When you hold the door open for a person walking up to the door of a building, who is it for? When you say “yarhamukumullah” to a person who sneezes, do you truly mean  “may Allah have mercy on you” with a pure intention, or do you say it in order to give you the semblance of a righteous person? Recently in class, we have studied Macbeth, a tale of deceit and betrayal, by William Shakespeare. This tale follows one paramount theme; “things are not what they appear.” This theme...

15

Tale of Two Lives

In my Masjid, the Khateeb mentioned two stories that were very touching and emotional. They were the Tale of Two Cities (Charles Dickens) Lives: one man and one girl. Both go through the same trials (concerning the types of friends they had), but the outcome is different for both of them. These are the words of the Khateeb, Imad Tibi, who is the principal of Al-Huda School in College Park, and these are his personal experiences. These are not the exact words but they convey the same meaning altogether:...