Tale of Two Lives A Short Story by

In my Masjid, the Khateeb mentioned two stories that were very touching and emotional. They were the Tale of Two Cities (Charles Dickens) Lives: one man and one girl. Both go through the same trials (concerning the types of friends they had), but the outcome is different for both of them.

These are the words of the Khateeb, Imad Tibi, who is the principal of Al-Huda School in College Park, and these are his personal experiences. These are not the exact words but they convey the same meaning altogether:

“In a Masjid I used to attend, I would pray Fajr there and over time, one would get to know all the people that would pray at the Masjid for Fajr. One day, somebody joined us for prayer and seeing that we could not recognize him, we saw that he was a newcomer to the Masjid. After the Fajr prayer was finished, he was seen heading towards the library and he was pacing the different shelves looking for a certain book. One of the community members approached him and said, “Normally, we don’t allow people in the library at this time, but seeing that you are here and looking for something, please tell me what it is that you are looking for and I will try my best to assist you”. The man said, “I am looking for a book on prayer”. The community member then showed him the correct area where to find the book and said that, “When you finish reading the book, please remember to bring it back.”

For the next few days, he started coming to the Masjid and overtime, he had conversations with the other community members and he started to get to know everybody better and the relationships became more personal. One day, the man told his personal story and mentioned it to the rest of the people.

He said that before, he came to America and after seeing its glamor, he wanted to be like the people here and be friends with him. Unfortunately, he picked the wrong type of friends to be around, and so, he started doing what they were doing. They used to go to parties, and he would join them. They all had girlfriends, so he also took on a girlfriend. They used to drink alcohol, so he started to drink alcohol. Over time, the situation became even worse because one of his friends came up to him with drugs and said, “Here are some vitamins.” He asked, “Don’t vitamins normally come in pills and you digest them through the mouth (instead of the nose)?” His friend said, “Don’t worry; this is a new type of vitamin.”

He became addicted to the drugs (I’m guessing he found out later that they were drugs). One day, at 3 pm, he and his girlfriend were in his apartment taking drugs and suddenly, he couldn’t breathe. He started to panic and as a result, his girlfriend also started to panic. She did the first thing that came to her mind – she called 911 for help. The ambulance came and took him to the hospital. Alhamdulillah, through Allah (subhanahu wa ta’ala)’s Mercy, the man survived that ordeal. From that day on, he repented and said that he would mend his ways, not go back to his former self, and strive to become a good Muslim. I sometimes see him, now and then, and I see that he has become a good Muslim. Allah (subhanahu wa ta’ala) gave him a chance to repent and he took that chance and acted upon it in one of the best manners possible.”

The second story is almost upon the same lines, but the outcome is more tragic.

“I used to be part of a Sunday school that the Masjid had. In that school, I would teach and I would also pick students up in a van for parents that were not able to drop their kids off. On that van, there would be a girl that was attending the Sunday school. She was in 9th grade and so she was basically entering High School. Her parents were conservative Muslims and were good people. However, she also had bad companionship (just like the man) and she would do many things that weren’t good. However, I thought to myself that at least she is still attending the Sunday school, which was a good sign that she was still learning about Islam and might change.

Sadly however, she continued to be with her bad friends and started to imitate their actions. One day, she went with her friends to a party to hang out. At that same location, a person came in with a gun and started shooting at the members of the party. There were two victims of that shooting… and the girl was one of them. She, just like the man, was rushed to the hospital. Sadly however, they weren’t able to rescue her and she passed away. Instead of driving her to school, I was now praying on her (his voice was breaking at this point)…

All I can imagine is that if she was to rise from her grave and stand in front of us, what would she say? Would she say to follow her former path and to submit to our whims and desires? No…”

All of us can recall an incident in our lives when we were close to being heavily injured or even killed but it was by Allah’s mercy that it did not happen. In those incidents, what is the feeling that we feel? We feel that we have been given another chance by Allah to improve ourselves. Imagine if you knew that you would die the next day. What would you do? You would constantly be reciting Quran, making Duas, praying to Allah, and trying your best to reform yourself before the inevitable moment was to come. One of the beautiful statements that Ali (radhi Allahu anhu) had once said was, “It wouldn’t make a difference if I see Jannah (Paradise) because I wouldn’t love it more. And even if I see Naar (Hell), I wouldn’t fear it more.” Basically he is saying that if Paradise and Hell were right in front of him, he would not be able to increase his Ibadah in the least. Subhanallah!

I conclude with this – before you fall asleep for the night, remember to yourself that there is no guarantee that you will wake up the following day. Our souls go to Allah (subhanahu wa ta’ala) during the night and then come back before we wake up. It is through His Mercy that it comes back and that he gives us another chance to become better. On the Day of Judgment, there will be people that will cry, “Oh Allah, please return us back to the Earth so that we can do more good deeds to enter Paradise”. But sadly, it will be too late by then. Make the best of this short life so that you can enjoy a life of eternity by the Mercy of Allah.

May Allah (subhanahu wa ta’ala) make us among the people that use our oppurtunities wisely and May He make us among the dwellers of Jannatul Firdaus. Ameen…


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  • http://www.themuslimblogger.com/ Karim

    “All of us can recall an incident in our lives when we were close to being heavily injured or even killed but it was by Allah’s mercy that it did not happen.”

    Subhana’Allah man that is so true. Not only me but someone close to me recently got into a horrible car accident and we were talking about some of these same point you are making when he was in the hospital.

    To your beautiful du’a at the end – I say Ameen.

  • http://www.themuslimblogger.com Karim

    “All of us can recall an incident in our lives when we were close to being heavily injured or even killed but it was by Allah’s mercy that it did not happen.”

    Subhana’Allah man that is so true. Not only me but someone close to me recently got into a horrible car accident and we were talking about some of these same point you are making when he was in the hospital.

    To your beautiful du’a at the end – I say Ameen.

  • http://aamerkhan.wordpress.com/ aamer khan

    something the salaf used to say is

    اعمل لاخرتك كآنك تموت غدا واعمل لدنياك كآنك تعيش آبدا
    Work for your Akhira as if you will die tomorrow, and work for your dunya as if you will live forever.

    and all help if from Allah.

  • abracadabra5

    Hello,
    I am not a Muslim but I find that I have a strange kindling with the way their language is expressed.

    I love the way you praise God/Allah and the people when you first meet them, enter their house, etc., but am somewhat confused and annoyed at all of the original expressions you use when describing a particular phase of prayer or prayer time, eg., Masjid, Khateeb, Al-Huda, Fajr, Alhamdulillah, subhanahu wa ta’ala, Duas, radhi Allahu anhu, Subhanallah, Ibadah, Jannatul Firdaus, and in the reply left by aamer khan, there are more, eg., salaf, Akhira.

    I am delighted however, that there are two words with the translation next to them: Jannah (Paradise) and, Naar (Hell)
    It puts things into perspective for me and allows me to get the gist for the rest of it without having to guess them all.

    I would respectfully like to make a plea to your religious leaders in Australia – if I may, and ask them for their permission for their followers be allowed to speak in English instead of using the original words. I imagine that some words are difficult to translate, but as I see it, this would be a step towards assimilating with the rest of us.

    This comment is not intended to insult anyone, but rather wish to have it regarded as a plea for some of us who do not speak the language to get an understanding of your faith which I think is absolutely beautiful if kept to its original meaning. I firmly believe that if we all thought and spoke in such a reverend way, there would be a lot less violence and discrimination spread around to a lot of beautiful peope. In God’s name/Allah, may the blessing and protection of the Great and Mighty One be upon us all.

    • shiney

      it seems like you’re interested in islam. maybe you should talk to someone on this website. i bet they would be able to help you out.

      • http://www.muslimyouthmusings.com/ Arif Kabir

        @Shiney Jazaakillahu Khayran for your concern. We have emailed her regarding this and have detailed every single term that she listed.

        • shiney

          lol i wasn’t just talking abt listing terms-i was talking abt da’wah. oh well- you guys did what you could. may allah reward you for it.

  • abracadabra5

    Hello,
    I am not a Muslim but I find that I have a strange kindling with the way their language is expressed.

    I love the way you praise God/Allah and the people when you first meet them, enter their house, etc., but am somewhat confused and annoyed at all of the original expressions you use when describing a particular phase of prayer or prayer time, eg., Masjid, Khateeb, Al-Huda, Fajr, Alhamdulillah, subhanahu wa ta’ala, Duas, radhi Allahu anhu, Subhanallah, Ibadah, Jannatul Firdaus, and in the reply left by aamer khan, there are more, eg., salaf, Akhira.

    I am delighted however, that there are two words with the translation next to them: Jannah (Paradise) and, Naar (Hell)
    It puts things into perspective for me and allows me to get the gist for the rest of it without having to guess them all.

    I would respectfully like to make a plea to your religious leaders in Australia – if I may, and ask them for their permission for their followers be allowed to speak in English instead of using the original words. I imagine that some words are difficult to translate, but as I see it, this would be a step towards assimilating with the rest of us.

    This comment is not intended to insult anyone, but rather wish to have it regarded as a plea for some of us who do not speak the language to get an understanding of your faith which I think is absolutely beautiful if kept to its original meaning. I firmly believe that if we all thought and spoke in such a reverend way, there would be a lot less violence and discrimination spread around to a lot of beautiful peope. In God’s name/Allah, may the blessing and protection of the Great and Mighty One be upon us all.

  • shiney

    it seems like you're interested in islam. maybe you should talk to someone on this website. i bet they would be able to help you out.

  • http://www.muslimyouthmusings.com/ Arif Kabir

    @Shiney Jazaakillahu Khayran for your concern. We have emailed her regarding this and have detailed every single term that she listed.

  • shiney

    lol i wasn't just talking abt listing terms-i was talking abt da'wah. oh well- you guys did what you could. may allah reward you for it.

  • http://aamerkhan.wordpress.com aamer khan

    something the salaf used to say is

    اعمل لاخرتك كآنك تموت غدا واعمل لدنياك كآنك تعيش آبدا
    Work for your Akhira as if you will die tomorrow, and work for your dunya as if you will live forever.

    and all help if from Allah.

  • SumaiyahKhan

    Ameen. It’s scary how most people realize thier mistakes and change after a tradegy has occurred to them. But sometimes, when that happens, you don’t have a chance afterwards…

  • Guest

    Hmm.. I think i remember hearing this khutbah from last year! Jazaakallahu khairan for the reminder…

  • Short_sister

    Ameen